Social and Behavioral Sciences Course Descriptions

The Definition of IAI GECC Social and Behavioral Sciences

Courses can be taken from the same identifier as long as the course outcomes are different.
Shortcuts to course description subsections:
AnthropologyEconomicsHistoryHuman Geography
Political SciencePsychologySociologyInterdisciplinary Social/Behavioral Science
D - Courses designed specifically to examine aspects of human diversity within the United States.
N - Courses designed specifically to examine aspects of human diversity from a non-Western perspective.


Anthropology

Anthropology focuses on the concept and characteristics of human culture, including the relationship between language and thought, between the individual and society, and between patterns of sexuality, marriage, and family organization in relation to the culture as a whole, as well as on the processes of variation and adaptation that create biological and cultural diversity in time and space. Upon satisfactory completion of one or more anthropology courses, students will:

  • summarize the assumptions and history and distinguish the perspective of anthropology and its subfields: sociocultural anthropology, physical anthropology, archaeology, linguistic anthropology, and applied anthropology;
  • demonstrate how anthropological information can help identify and solve social problems using basic research methods, including field work, documents, Human Resource Area Files, and archaeological techniques within the structure of the scientific method;
  • develop a holistic, cross-cultural perspective in order to gain an appreciation of cultural similarities and differences and enhance intercultural sensitivity; and
  • describe the on-going evolution of ethical standards guiding research and the treatment of artifacts and human remains.
S1900N : Introduction to Anthropology(3 semester credits)

Introduction to the nature of humans and their development and relationship to the physical and social environment today and in the past. Surveys the major subfields of: anthropology, cultural anthropology, physical anthropology, archaeology and linguistics.

S1901N : Introduction to Cultural Anthropology(3 semester credits)

Introduction to culture, as an adaptive mechanism that provides for the survival of the human species. Encompasses social organization, technology, economics, religion and language as used by various peoples, both past and present.

S1902 : Introduction to Physical Anthropology(3 semester credits)

Explores human origins, fossil records, human adaptation and variation, population genetics and human-kind's place in world ecology.

S1903 : Introduction to Archaeology(3 semester credits)

Introduces concepts, principles, and methods used to reconstruct cultural history and prehistory. Explores sequences of cultural development that have been learned through archaeological analysis.

S1904D : Applied Anthropology(3 semester credits)

Explores the application of anthropological concepts, techniques and information to understanding modern problems. Discusses the relevance of anthropology to development issues and to concerns within various career fields.

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Economics

Economics is concerned with the allocation of scarce resources to achieve the maximum satisfaction of unlimited wants. Upon satisfactory completion of one or more economics courses, students will:

  • demonstrate knowledge of the theories, tools, and methods of economic analysis;
  • apply economic principles in the analysis of economic problems and policies;
  • identify the major economic institutions and describe their operation and inter-relationships;
  • analyze those aspects of human behavior, both individual and social, through which the economic problem is addressed; and
  • describe the different economic systems into which societies organize themselves to deal with the economic problem.
S3900 : Principles of Economics(3 semester credits)

Introduction to national income theories, price theories and behavior of the firm under varying economic conditions. Includes the economic roles of business, government and households; economic fluctuations and growth; money and banking; and international economics. 

S3901 : Principles of Macroeconomics(3 semester credits)

Introduction to national income theories, economic fluctuations and growth, money and banking, and international economics. Policies on the acceptance of AP credit vary among academic programs and from institution to institution, so AP credit toward the GECC or major requirements is not guaranteed.  A score of 3 or higher on the AP Macroeconomics exam may be considered as equivalent to successful completion of postsecondary courses approved for IAI GECC S3 901. Feb 2016

S3902 : Principles of Microeconomics(3 semester credits)

Introduction to price theories, the behavior of the firm under varying market conditions and the behavior of the consumer. Policies on the acceptance of AP credit vary among academic programs and from institution to institution, so AP credit toward the GECC or major requirements is not guaranteed.  A score of 3 or higher on the AP Microeconomics exam may be considered as equivalent to successful completion of postsecondary courses approved for IAI GECC S3 902. Feb 2016

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History

The study of history exposes students to the complexities of human nature and the development of diverse human cultures, values, institutions, and major events. Upon satisfactory completion of one or more history courses, students will:

  • distinguish between primary and secondary sources as the foundation of modern historical scholarship;
  • interpret primary sources critically by analyzing their historical contexts;
  • formulate historical interpretations, both orally and in writing, and defend them critically with reference to primary and secondary sources; and
  • incorporate into historical interpretations, both orally and in writing, an understanding of historical causation reflecting a) knowledge of important figures and events and their chronological relationship to each other and b) an awareness of the contingent relationships among social, political, religious, intellectual, cultural and economic variables.
S2900 : United States History I(3 semester credits)

The history of the United States, including the origins and development of its peoples and cultures.  Part I typically ends c. 1865-1877. (See also U.S. History I in the Humanities and Fine Arts section. Credit cannot be used to satisfy both the Humanities and Social and Behavioral Science requirements.)Policies on the acceptance of AP credit vary among academic programs and from institution to institution, so AP credit toward the GECC or major requirements is not guaranteed.  A score of 3 or higher on the AP U.S. History exam may be considered as equivalent to successful completion of postsecondary courses approved for IAI GECC S2 900. Feb 2016

Revised 06/07/2017 - Matches description for H2904

S2901 : United States History II(3 semester credits)

This is a continuation of United States History I, from c. 1865-1877 until the present. See the Illinois Transferable General Education Core Curriculum (iTransfer Gen. Ed.) number S2900. (See also U.S. History II in the Humanities and Fine Arts section; credit cannot be used to fulfill both Humanities and Social Science requirements.) Policies on the acceptance of AP credit vary among academic programs and from institution to institution, so AP credit toward the GECC or major requirements is not guaranteed.  A score of 3 or higher on the AP U.S. History exam may be considered as equivalent to successful completion of postsecondary courses approved for IAI GECC S2 901. Feb 2016

Revised 06/07/2017 - Matches description for H2905

S2902 : History of Western Civilization I(3 semester credits)

The history of the Western world, including the origins and development of its peoples and cultures.  Part I typically ends c. 1500-1650. Policies on the acceptance of AP credit vary among academic programs and from institution to institution, so AP credit toward the GECC or major requirements is not guaranteed.  A score of 3 or higher on the AP European History exam may be considered as equivalent to successful completion of postsecondary courses approved for IAI GECC S2 902. - Feb 2016

Revised 06/07/2017 - Matches description for H2901

S2903 : History of Western Civilization II(3 semester credits)

This is a continuation of History of Western Civilization I, continuing from c. 1500-1650 until the present . See the Illinois Transferable General Education Core Curriculum (iTransfer Gen. Ed.) number S2 902Policies on the acceptance of AP credit vary among academic programs and from institution to institution, so AP credit toward the GECC or major requirements is not guaranteed.  A score of 3 or higher on the AP European History exam may be considered as equivalent to successful completion of postsecondary courses approved for IAI GECC S2 903. - Feb 2016

Revised 06/07/2017 - Matches description for H2902

S2904N : History of the Non-Western World I(3 semester credits)

The history of the non-Western world (Asia, the Middle East, Africa or Latin America), including the origins and development of peoples and cultures.  Part I typically ends c. 1500 CE. (See also Non-Western Civilizations in the Humanities and Fine Arts section. Credit cannot be used to satisfy both Humanities and Social and Behavioral Science requirements.)

Revised 06/07/2017 - Matches description for H2910N

S2905N : History of the Non-Western World II(3 semester credits)

This is a continuation of History of the Non-Western World I, from c. 1500 until the present. See the Illinois Transferable General Education Core Curriculum (iTransfer Gen. Ed.) number S2 904N. (See also Non-Western Civilizations in the Humanities and Fine Arts section. Credit cannot be used to satisfy both Humanities and Social and Behavioral Science requirements.)

Revised 06/07/2017 - Matches description for H2911N

S2906N : History of Africa I(3 semester credits)

Retired 08/15/2018: Political, social and economic history of Africa, including the origins and development of its peoples and cultures to the present.

For any new submissions see the  S2920N  identifier.

S2907N : History of Africa II(3 semester credits)

Retired 08/15/2018: This is a continuation of History of Africa I. See the Illinois Transferable General Education Core Curriculum (iTransfer Gen. Ed.) number S2 906N.

For any new submissions see the  S2920N  identifier.

S2908N : History of Asia and the Pacific I(3 semester credits)

Retired 8/15/2018: Political, social and economic history of Asia and the Pacific region, including the origins and development of its peoples and cultures to the present.

For any new submissions see the  S2920N  identifier.

S2909N : History of Asia and the Pacific II(3 semester credits)

Retired 08/15/2018:  This is a continuation of History of Asia and the Pacific I . See the Illinois Transferable General Education Core Curriculum (iTransfer Gen. Ed.) number S2 908N.

For any new submissions see the  S2920N  identifier.

S2910N : History of Latin America I(3 semester credits)

Retired 08/15/2018: Political, social and economic history of principal Latin American nations, including the origins and development of its peoples and cultures to the present.

For any new submissions see the  S2920N  identifier.

S2911N : History of Latin America II(3 semester credits)

Retired 08/15/2017: This is a continuation of History of Latin America I. See the Illinois Transferable General Education Core Curriculum (iTransfer Gen. Ed.) number S2 910N.

For any new submissions see the  S2920N  identifier.

S2912N : World History I(3 semester credits)

The history of the world, including the origins and development of its peoples and cultures.  Part I typically ends c. 1500. (See also World History I in the Humanities and Fine Arts section. Credit for courses cannot be used to satisfy both Humanities and Social and Behavioral Science requirements.) Policies on the acceptance of AP credit vary among academic programs and from institution to institution, so AP credit toward the GECC or major requirements is not guaranteed.  A score of 3 or higher on the AP World History exam may be considered as equivalent to successful completion of postsecondary courses approved for IAI GECC S2 912N. Feb 2016

Revised 06/07/2017 - Matches description for H2906N

S2913N : World History II(3 semester credits)

This is a continuation of World History I, continuing from c. 1500 to the present. See the Illinois Transferable General Education Core Curriculum (iTransfer Gen. Ed.) number S2 912N. (See also World History II in the Humanities and Fine Arts section. Credit for courses cannot be used to satisfy both Humanities and Social and Behavioral Science requirements.) Policies on the acceptance of AP credit vary among academic programs and from institution to institution, so AP credit toward the GECC or major requirements is not guaranteed.  A score of 3 or higher on the AP World History exam may be considered as equivalent to successful completion of postsecondary courses approved for IAI GECC S2 913N. Feb 2016

Revised 06/07/2017 - Matches description for H2907

S2914N : History of China I(3 semester credits)

Retired 08/15/2018: Political, social and economic history of China, including the origins and development of its peoples and cultures.

For any new submissions see the  S2920N  identifier.

S2915N : History of China II(3 semester credits)

Retired 08/15/2018:  This is a continuation of History of China I. See the Illinois Transferable General Education Core Curriculum (iTranfer Gen. Ed.) number S2 914N.

For any new submissions see the  S2920N  identifier.

S2916N : History of South Asia I(3 semester credits)

Retired 08/15/2018:  A survey of political, social and economic history of South Asia, including the origins and development of its peoples and cultures to the present.

For any new submissions see the  S2920N  identifier.

S2917N : History of South Asia II(3 semester credits)

Retired 08/15/2018: This is a continuation of History of South Asia I. See the Illinois Transferable General Education Core Curriculum (iTransfer Gen. Ed.) number S2 916N.

For any new submissions see the  S2920N  identifier.

S2918N : History of the Middle East I(3 semester credits)

Retired 08/15/2018:  A survey of political, social, economic and cultural history of the Middle East from ancient times to the present.

For any new submissions see the  S2920N  identifier.

S2919N : History of the Middle East II(3 semester credits)

Retired 08/15/2018:  This is a continuation of History of the Middle East I. See the Illinois Transferable General Education Core Curriculum (iTransfer Gen. Ed.) number S2 919N.

For any new submissions see the  S2920N  identifier.

S2920N : Non-Western Civilizations(3 semester credits)

The history of the civilizations of the non-Western world (Asia, the Middle East, Africa and Latin America), including the origins and development of peoples and cultures to the present, when taught as a one-part single-semester course. (See also Non-Western Civilizations in the Humanities and Fine Arts section. Credit cannot be used to satisfy both the Humanities and Social and Behavioral Science requirements.)

Revised 06/07/2017 - Matches description for H2903N

S2921N : World History(3 semester credits)

The history of the world, including the origins and development of its peoples and cultures to the present, when taught as a one-part, single-semester course. (Credit for courses cannot be used to satisfy both Humanities and Social and Behavioral Science requirements.)

Revised 06/07/2017 - Matches description for H2912N

S2922 : National Histories(3 semester credits)

Broad survey of the history and culture of a nation that has demonstrated a significant impact on global history (ex. Japan, Russia, England). (Credit cannot be used to satisfy both the Humanities and Social and Behavioral Science requirements.)

Revised 06/07/2017 - Matches description for H2908

S2923D : Histories of Cultural or Ethnic Minority Groups in the U.S.(3 semester credits)

A broad survey of the history of one or more particular cultural or ethnic minority groups in the United States and their cross-cultural influences. (Credit cannot be used to satisfy both the Humanities and Social and Behavioral Science requirements.)

Revised 06/07/2017 - Matches description for H2909D

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Human Geography

Human geography focuses on the uneven distribution of people and of human activity on the surface of the earth and on the causes and consequences of these uneven spatial patterns and cultural landscapes. Upon satisfactory completion of one or more human geography courses, students will:

  • gain insight using geospatial and map analysis into their own behavior by recognizing that the individual choices they make are part of a wider pattern of locational and environmental choices that ultimately form the geographic patterns of the world of the future;
  • demonstrate knowledge of their own society and of the world at large by examining differences and similarities in human activity from place to place;
  • develop analytical and critical thinking skills and use them to explore and critique suggested explanations of the uneven distribution of human activity; and
  • define key concepts in geography, summarize the ways in which (important) geographers have explained spatial patterns, and explain their own thinking about the relationships between people and the world in which they live.
S4900N : Introduction to Human Geography(3 semester credits)

A systematic or regional introduction to the basic concepts of human geography using spatial analysis/awareness with both traditional and digital map analysis. Examines the causes and consequences of the uneven distribution of human activity, covering such themes as population, culture, economic activity, development, and urban patterns. Policies on the acceptance of AP credit vary among academic programs and from institution to institution, so AP credit toward the GECC or major requirements is not guaranteed.  A score of 3 or higher on the AP Human Geography exam may be considered as equivalent to successful completion of postsecondary courses approved for IAI GECC S4 900N. Feb 2016

Revised Fall 2016 - 10/31/2016

S4901 : Geography of the Developed (or Western) World(3 semester credits)

Examines the regions of the world conventionally called “industrialized” or “developed,” including the spatial patterns of physical and cultural elements that impart unique identities within these regions. using spatial analysis of both digital and traditional maps to promote critical thinking of complex geographic relationships among regions of world .

Revised Fall 2016 - 10/16/2016

S4902N : Geography of the Developing (or Non-Western) World(3 semester credits)

Examines the regions of the world conventionally called “developing” or “emerging,” including the spatial patterns of physical and cultural elements that impart unique identities within these regions using both digital and traditional maps to explore complex geopolitical relations among developing regions of the world.

Revised Fall 2016 - 10/31/2016

S4903N : Introduction to Economic Geography(3 semester credits)

Introduction to the global patterns of economic activity (production, exchange, consumption), and the theories and processes that have led to spatial-temporal adaptations to human and physical environments and to uneven development. 

Reviewed Fall 2016 - 10/31/2016

S4904 : Geography of International Conflicts(3 semester credits)

Retired 8/15/2019 - Introduction to geographical perspectives on conflicts beyond national boundaries, e.g., territorial disputes and competition among states for resources, with a focus on contemporary world issues and patterns using maps (digital and paper) to support critical thinking and spatial awareness/relationships connecting to driving international conflicts. 

Reviewed Fall 2017 - Panel Retired Descriptor - 2 Courses Retired and Institutions Notified

S4905 : Introduction to Geo-Spatial Thinking and Literacy(3 semester credits)

Introduction to digital maps, spatial analysis techniques, and technology used to explore critical geographic and spatial patterns shaping the cultural and/or physical world.

S4906 : World Geography(3 semester credits)

A thematic or regional introduction to the basic concepts of how world regions are constructed or classified.   Using spatial analysis of both traditional and digital maps factors will be explored to assess how regions evolve, change over time, and are classified.  Concepts will explore both developed and undeveloped regions connecting both human and physical geographical factors shaping and defining the classification of regions and interrelationships between them.  

Created 10/27/2017 - Effective Spring 2018 - Available for new submissions!

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Political Science

Political science deals with the theory and practice of politics and describes and analyzes political systems and political behavior. Upon satisfactory completion of one or more political science courses, students will:

  • explain the relationships between political life and the cultural ideas of American democracy;
  • describe formal government institutions and legal structures and political behavior and processes;
  • describe the political systems of other countries, identify international organizations, and explain the relationships between nations;
  • analyze and evaluate political phenomena;
  • demonstrate an understanding of and skill in the process of social scientific inquiry;
  • make explicit and analyze value judgments about political decisions and policies;
  • explain the social-psychological sources and historical-cultural origins of their own political attitudes and values, and analyze critically the personal and social implications of alternative values; and
  • demonstrate an understanding of the capacities and skills needed to participate effectively and democratically in society.
S5900 : American/U.S. National Government I(3 semester credits)

An introduction to the organization and function of the U.S. national government. Includes the U.S. Constitution; the federal system; political behavior; executive, legislative, and judicial powers; and public policy. Policies on the acceptance of AP credit vary among academic programs and from institution to institution, so AP credit toward the GECC or major requirements is not guaranteed.  A score of 3 or higher on the AP U.S. Government exam may be considered as equivalent to successful completion of postsecondary courses approved for IAI GECC S5 900. Feb 2016

S5901 : American/U.S. National Government II(3 semester credits)

RETIRED: 01/01/2015 - An introduction to the organization and function of the U.S. national government. Includes the U.S. Constitution; the federal system; political behavior; executive, legislative, and judicial powers; and public policy.Policies on acceptance of AP credit vary among academic programs and from institution to institution, so AP credit toward the GECC or major requirements is not guaranteed. In general, a score of 3 or higher on the AP U.S. Government and Politics exam may be considered as equivalent to successful completion of courses approved for S5 900.

S5902 : American/U.S. State and Local Government(3 semester credits)

Examines state and local political jurisdictions and systems, including their powers, organization, functions, development and contemporary problems.

S5903 : Introduction to Political Science(3 semester credits)

Introduction to the principles and methods of political science, focusing on the nature and development of political science as a discipline, the political process, political institutions and the inter-relationships among elements in the political system.
Revised Fall 2017 - 10/27/2017 - Effective Spring 2018 - Course Title Changed Only

S5904 : International Relations(3 semester credits)

Introduction to international relations, emphasizing contemporary international problems and relations. Includes analysis of international behavior, international law, foreign policy, causes of conflicts and potential solutions.

S5905 : Comparative Government(3 semester credits)

Comparative analysis of the political systems of selected countries, including such topics as institutions, electoral systems, principles of governance and causes of political instability and revolution. Policies on the acceptance of AP credit vary among academic programs and from institution to institution, so AP credit toward the GECC or major requirements is not guaranteed.  A score of 3 or higher on the AP Comparative Government & Politics exam may be considered as equivalent to successful completion of postsecondary courses approved for IAI GECC S5 905. Feb 2016

S5906N : Non-Western Comparative Government(3 semester credits)

Comparative examination of the political systems of selected non-Western countries, including institutions, electoral systems, principles of governance, causes of political instability and revolution, and techniques of political analysis.

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Psychology

Psychology is the scientific study of human and animal behavior, as well as those biological and mental processes that underlie behavior. Upon satisfactory completion of one or more psychology courses, students will:

  • explain the nature of psychology as a contemporary science, discuss psychological issues intelligently and methodically, and describe both the contributions and limitations of psychological science and the promise of the future of the field and its attendant problems;
  • explain the role played by the scientific method in the acquisition of knowledge about the basic principles of human and animal behavior;
  • identify the principles that govern human and animal behavior and apply these principles to their own lives to enhance interactions between individuals and among societal groups;
  • apply a knowledge of the historical background, basic theories, facts, and research questions in such major topic areas as research methods, biological psychology, cognitive psychology, learning theory and memory, perceptual processes, developmental psychology, personality, abnormal/clinical psychology, and social psychology;
  • summarize research-based knowledge concerning the application of psychological principles to everyday life, including the study of the behavior of individuals and groups, the parameters of behavioral deviance and its various therapies, the study of individual differences, and explain the role of psychology in such areas as industry, complex organizations, law, and education; and
  • explain and appropriately apply the code of ethics in psychology in diverse situations.
S6900 : General Psychology(3 semester credits)

A survey of the study of human and animal behavior with emphasis on the scientific nature of contemporary psychological investigation. Topics may include the biology of behavior, sensation and perception, learning, memory, cognition, motivation, emotion, life-span development of behavior, personality, abnormal behavior and its therapies, social behavior and individual differences. Policies on the acceptance of AP credit vary among academic programs and from institution to institution, so AP credit toward the GECC or major requirements is not guaranteed.  A score of 3 or higher on the AP Psychology exam may be considered as equivalent to successful completion of postsecondary courses approved for IAI GECC S6 900. Feb 2016

S6901 : General Psychology II (No longer used in IAI)(3 semester credits)

This course was discontinued as part of the IAI starting Fall of 2001.

This is a continuation of General Psychology I. See the Illinois Transferable General Education Core Curriculum (iTransfer Gen. Ed.) number S6 900. 

S8900 : Social Psychology(3 semester credits)

Psychology :
A systematic introduction to theory and research on the ways social factors influence individual and group behavior. Examines attitudes, social perception, the establishment of norms, conformity, leadership, group dynamics and research methods, emphasizing their effects on the individual. (See also Sociology; credit granted only once and in 1 discipline.)

Sociology:
Exploration of the connections between group experience and individual behavior, including the development of "self," conformity and deviance, attitudes, attraction, intergroup interaction and collective behavior. (See also Psychology; credit granted only once and in 1 discipline.)

S6902 : Life-span Developmental Psychology(3 semester credits)

A study of the neurobiological, physical, cognitive, social and emotional development of humans from conception through childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age. Emphasizes normal developmental stages and patterns of adjustment to differing life-time demands. The theories and principles of human development are examined in light of contemporary research.

S6903 : Child Psychology(3 semester credits)

Introduction to theory and research on the biological, physical, social and cognitive development of the human child from conception to adolescence. Topics may include genetic factors, prenatal development, sensory and perceptual changes, motor system development, language acquisition, social learning, cultural influences and aspects of abnormal development.

S6904 : Childhood and Adolescent Psychology or Adolescent Psychology(3 semester credits)

Introduction to the development of children and adolescents (or adolescents), with emphasis on physical and physiological changes and social and cognitive development. Topics may include: the role of play; sociocultural influences; stresses associated with adolescence; changing relationships with family, friends and the opposite sex; identity development; sexuality; drug use; suicide; and delinquency.

S6905 : Adulthood and Aging(3 semester credits)

Introduction to the changes that occur from early adulthood through old age. Topics may include: career choice and development; mate selection and marriage; conventional and nonconventional families; theories of adult personality development; mid- and late-life transitions; aging; and dying, death and bereavement.

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Sociology

Sociology is the systematic study of human society and human behavior in social settings. Upon satisfactory completion of one or more sociology courses, students will:

    I>compare and contrast basic sociological theories, including functionalism, conflict theory, and symbolic interactionism, as well as the methodology of sociological analysis;
  • describe the factors governing social life, including culture and subculture, socialization, social structure and organization, social institutions, and social control;
  • identify the factors in social change, including the historical development of society, deviance, collective behavior, and social movements; and
  • apply a global and cross-cultural perspective in understanding the sources of similarities and differences in the human experience.
S7900 : Introduction to Sociology(3 semester credits)

A study of society, including the rules, interactions and cultural patterns that organize everyday life. Includes the analysis of social conflict, the structure and function of institutions, the dynamics of individual and group interactions, social stratification and interactions among diverse groups of people.

S7901 : Social Problems(3 semester credits)

Analysis of contemporary social problems and investigation of theories on social organization and conflict. Explores the genesis, significance and amelioration of social problems.

S7902 : Marriage and Family(3 semester credits)

Survey of the contemporary family in historical and cross-cultural perspectives. Includes trends in mate selection, marriage, child-rearing, employment, gender roles and communication within the family.

S7903D : Racial and Ethnic Relations(3 semester credits)

Analysis of racial, religious, ethnic and other groups, examining persistence of group identity, inter-group relations, social movements, government policy and related social problems.

S7904D : The Sociology of Sex and Gender(3 semester credits)

Introduction to sociological perspectives on gender as a factor in social stratification, gender role acquisition, and individual and social consequences of changing social definitions of gender roles.

S8900 : Social Psychology(3 semester credits)

Psychology :
A systematic introduction to theory and research on the ways social factors influence individual and group behavior. Examines attitudes, social perception, the establishment of norms, conformity, leadership, group dynamics and research methods, emphasizing their effects on the individual. (See also Sociology; credit granted only once and in 1 discipline.)

Sociology:
Exploration of the connections between group experience and individual behavior, including the development of "self," conformity and deviance, attitudes, attraction, intergroup interaction and collective behavior. (See also Psychology; credit granted only once and in 1 discipline.)

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Interdisciplinary Social/Behavioral Science

S9900 : Interdisciplinary Social/Behavioral Science I(3 semester credits)

Interdisciplinary courses that combine 2 or more of the social and behavioral science disciplines and that meet the following criteria will be acceptable.

"Social and behavioral science interdisciplinary courses" are those that integrate two or more disciplines in the social and behavioral sciences. Courses will be survey in nature, broad in scope, and foundational in the sense that they provide students with a basis for intellectual development and further study in the various disciplines. The relationship between the disciplines will be made explicit in the course. Textbooks and readings from those disciplines will be a significant part of the course, and methods of instruction may include instructors from more than one of the disciplines teaching jointly. On satisfactory completion of an interdisciplinary social and behavioral science course, students will

  • derive a balance of the concepts, theories, methods, and conclusions of each discipline.
  • gain an understanding of two or more of the social or behavioral sciences

S9901 : Interdisciplinary Social/Behavioral Science II(3 semester credits)

Interdisciplinary courses that combine 2 or more of the social and behavioral science disciplines and that meet the following criteria will be acceptable.

"Social and behavioral science interdisciplinary courses" are those that integrate two or more disciplines in the social and behavioral sciences. Courses will be survey in nature, broad in scope, and foundational in the sense that they provide students with a basis for intellectual development and further study in the various disciplines. The relationship between the disciplines will be made explicit in the course. Textbooks and readings from those disciplines will be a significant part of the course, and methods of instruction may include instructors from more than one of the disciplines teaching jointly. On satisfactory completion of an interdisciplinary social and behavioral science course, students will

  • derive a balance of the concepts, theories, methods, and conclusions of each discipline.
  • gain an understanding of two or more of the social or behavioral sciences

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Interdisciplinary Humanities/Fine Arts and Social/Behavioral Sciences

HS900 : Interdisciplinary Humanities/Fine Arts & Social/Behavioral Sciences I(3 semester credits)

RETIRED: 08/15/2020 - Courses that combine thematic-or genre-based study in both humanities and fine arts with study in one or more social or behavioral sciences. Completion of both HS 900 and HS 901 (6 credits) are necessary to receive credit toward the IAI General Education Core Curriculum (GECC).

Interdisciplinary courses are those that integrate two or more disciplines. Courses will be survey in nature, broad in scope, and foundational in the sense that they provide students with a basis for intellectual development and further study in the various disciplines. The relationship between the disciplines will be made explicit in the course. Textbooks and reading from those disciplines will be a significant part of the course, and methods of instruction may include instructors from more than one of the disciplines teaching jointly. On satisfactory completion of an interdisciplinary course, students will:

- derive a balance of the concepts, theories, methods, and conclusions of each discipline, and,

- gain an understanding of two or more of the disciplines covered.

Reviewed Fall 2017 - Panel Retired Descriptor - 3 Courses Retired and Institutions Notified

HS901 : Interdisciplinary Humanities/Fine Arts & Social/Behavioral Sciences II(3 semester credits)

RETIRED 08/15/2020:  Courses that combine thematic-or genre-based study in both humanities and fine arts with study in one or more social or behavioral sciences. Completion of both HS 900 and HS 901 (6 credits) are necessary to receive credit toward the IAI General Education Core Curriculum (GECC).

Interdisciplinary courses are those that integrate two or more disciplines. Courses will be survey in nature, broad in scope, and foundational in the sense that they provide students with a basis for intellectual development and further study in the various disciplines. The relationship between the disciplines will be made explicit in the course. Textbooks and reading from those disciplines will be a significant part of the course, and methods of instruction may include instructors from more than one of the disciplines teaching jointly. On satisfactory completion of an interdisciplinary course, students will:

- derive a balance of the concepts, theories, methods, and conclusions of each discipline, and,

- gain an understanding of two or more of the disciplines covered.

Reviewed Fall 2017 - Panel Retired Descriptor - 1 Course Retired and Institution Notified 

HS902 : Interdisciplinary Humanities/Fine Arts & Social/Behavioral Sciences III(3 semester credits)

RETIRED 08/15/2020:  Courses that combine thematic-or genre-based study in both humanities and fine arts with study in one or more social or behavioral sciences. Completion of both HS 902 and HS 903 (6 credits) are necessary to receive credit toward the IAI General Education Core Curriculum (GECC).

Interdisciplinary courses are those that integrate two or more disciplines. Courses will be survey in nature, broad in scope, and foundational in the sense that they provide students with a basis for intellectual development and further study in the various disciplines. The relationship between the disciplines will be made explicit in the course. Textbooks and reading from those disciplines will be a significant part of the course, and methods of instruction may include instructors from more than one of the disciplines teaching jointly. On satisfactory completion of an interdisciplinary course, students will:

- derive a balance of the concepts, theories, methods, and conclusions of each discipline, and,

- gain an understanding of two or more of the disciplines covered.

Reviewed Fall 2017 - Panel Retired Descriptor - 1 Course Retired and Institution Notified

HS903 : Interdisciplinary Humanities/Fine Arts & Social/Behavioral Sciences IV(3 semester credits)

RETIRED 08/15/2020:  Courses that combine thematic-or genre-based study in both humanities and fine arts with study in one or more social or behavioral sciences. Completion of both HS 902 and HS 903 (6 credits) are necessary to receive credit toward the IAI General Education Core Curriculum (GECC).

Interdisciplinary courses are those that integrate two or more disciplines. Courses will be survey in nature, broad in scope, and foundational in the sense that they provide students with a basis for intellectual development and further study in the various disciplines. The relationship between the disciplines will be made explicit in the course. Textbooks and reading from those disciplines will be a significant part of the course, and methods of instruction may include instructors from more than one of the disciplines teaching jointly. On satisfactory completion of an interdisciplinary course, students will:

- derive a balance of the concepts, theories, methods, and conclusions of each discipline, and,

- gain an understanding of two or more of the disciplines covered.

Reviewed Fall 2017 - Panel Retired Descriptor - 1 Course Retired and Institution Notified

 

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D - Courses designed specifically to examine aspects of human diversity within the United States.
N - Courses designed specifically to examine aspects of human diversity from a non-Western perspective.




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