Communication Course Descriptions

The Definition of IAI GECC Communication

The following two classes in sequence; C1 900 and C1 901R or C1 900R and C1 901. To complete the sequence successfully, one of the two courses must have the R suffix. (The R suffix designates a course with a research paper.)


C1900 : Writing Course Sequence

(3 semester credits)

C1901R : Writing Course Sequence

(3 semester credits)

The writing course sequence (1) develops awareness of the writing process; (2) provides inventional, organizational and editorial strategies; (3) stresses the variety of uses for writing; and (4) emphasizes critical skills in reading, thinking and writing. The writing course sequence must include production of documented, multi-source writing in one or two papers for a combined total of at least 2500 words in final version. The panel has compared the IAI GECC C1 901R descriptor against the AP English Language & Composition and AP English Literature & Composition exams and determined there is not a match. Feb 2016

Upon successful completion of the writing course sequence (which requires grades of C or better for students entering in Summer 1999 and beyond), students should have the competencies listed below. The student is expected to:

  • comprehend, analyze, and critique a variety of texts including academic discourse;
  • use various invention, drafting, and revising/ editing strategies depending upon the purpose of the writing, the materials available to the writer, and the length of time available for the task;
  • engage a topic in which the writer explores writing as a means of self-discovery and produces a text that is designed to persuade the reader of the writer's commitment;
  • demonstrate a theoretical understanding of rhetorical context (that is, how reader, writer, language, and subject matter interact);
  • establish a voice appropriate to the topic selected and the rhetorical situation;
  • clarify major aims, arrange material to support aims, and provide sufficient materials to satisfy expectations of readers;
  • select, evaluate, and interact effectively with sources, subordinating them to the writer's purpose and creating confidence that they have been represented fairly;
  • demonstrate satisfactory control over the conventions of edited American English and competently attend to the elements of presentation (including layout, format, and printing); and
  • recognize the existence of discourse communities with their different conventions and forms.


C1901 : Writing Course Sequence

(3 semester credits)

C1900R : Writing Course Sequence

(3 semester credits)

The writing course sequence (1) develops awareness of the writing process; (2) provides inventional, organizational and editorial strategies; (3) stresses the variety of uses for writing; and (4) emphasizes critical skills in reading, thinking and writing. The writing course sequence must include production of documented, multi-source writing in one or two papers for a combined total of at least 2500 words in final version. The panel has compared the IAI GECC C1 900R descriptor against the AP English Language & Composition and AP English Literature & Composition exams and determined there is not a match. Feb 2016

Upon successful completion of the writing course sequence (which requires grades of C or better for students entering in Summer 1999 and beyond), students should have the competencies listed below. The student is expected to:

  • comprehend, analyze, and critique a variety of texts including academic discourse;
  • use various invention, drafting, and revising/ editing strategies depending upon the purpose of the writing, the materials available to the writer, and the length of time available for the task;
  • engage a topic in which the writer explores writing as a means of self-discovery and produces a text that is designed to persuade the reader of the writer's commitment;
  • demonstrate a theoretical understanding of rhetorical context (that is, how reader, writer, language, and subject matter interact);
  • establish a voice appropriate to the topic selected and the rhetorical situation;
  • clarify major aims, arrange material to support aims, and provide sufficient materials to satisfy expectations of readers;
  • select, evaluate, and interact effectively with sources, subordinating them to the writer's purpose and creating confidence that they have been represented fairly;
  • demonstrate satisfactory control over the conventions of edited American English and competently attend to the elements of presentation (including layout, format, and printing); and
  • recognize the existence of discourse communities with their different conventions and forms.


C2900 : Oral Communication

(3 semester credits)

The following is revised C2 900 course description, effective Fall 2012, which includes the addition of an online speech course accommodation - 05/14/2012: 

The oral communication course, either a traditional public speaking or a hybrid content course, combines communication theory with the practice of oral communication skills. The oral communication course: (1) develops awareness of the communication process; (2) provides inventional, organizational and expressive strategies; (3) promotes understanding of and adaptation to a variety of communication contexts; and (4) emphasizes critical skills in listening, reading, thinking and speaking.

Students are expected to prepare and deliver at least three substantive speeches, including both informative and persuasive assignments delivered extemporaneously. To be substantial, these speeches should be of sufficient length to allow for careful development of thought  (an individual presentation of at least five continuous minutes and requires significant attention to invention and organization). At least one of the substantive speeches must include multiple sources that are verbally cited. The oral communication assignments (including speeches, outlines, self evaluations, and other speaking activities) must account for at least 50% of the final grade. 

The face-to-face performance of the three substantial speeches with the class and the instructor serving as an in-class audience is the preferred method of instruction.  Institutions that need to accommodate students who cannot attend on campus courses may offer online sections or courses of C2 900 to supplement their face-to-face offerings.  This accommodation requires that a fully online C 2900 course meet all IAI oral communication guidelines and must also meet or exceed the following criteria:

1.       VENUE:  Face-to-face performances (speaker and audience) are required of the three substantial speeches in an appropriate setting for a public speech, such as a workplace or community venue.

2        AUDIENCE:  At least 8 individuals, aged 16 and over, must be present for the entire presentation and must be seen on camera for each performance.  Audience members must be aware that they will be recorded or streamed live. Video will be viewed by the instructor and the online class. Students must define their audience (demographics and psychographics).

3.      TECHNOLOGY:  Technology requirements must be clearly explained to students at the beginning of the course. Students taking the fully online course are expected to utilize appropriate technology despite the challenges of access. The quality of the recording must permit clear sound and video. Speeches may not be edited.  Student privacy must be protected by the institution.

Upon successful completion of the oral communication course, students should have attained at least the competencies in both theory and practice listed below.

 

Communication Theory--The student is expected to:

·       have a theoretical understanding of communication;

·       understand the relationships among self, message and others; and

·       understand the process of effective listening.

Communication Practice--The student is expected to:

·       phrase clear, responsible and appropriate purpose statements;

·       develop specific, well-focused thesis statements;

·       analyze an audience and situation, and then adapt a message to those needs;

·       generate ideas and gather supporting material;

·       incorporate material from various appropriate sources, using proper verbal citations;

·       use evidence, reasoning and motivational appeals in persuasive speaking;

·       prepare and use visual aids that promote clarity and interest;

·       organize and outline an effective message;

·       use language that is appropriate to enhance understanding and affect the desired result;

·       establish credibility by demonstrating knowledge and analysis of topic;

·       use extemporaneous delivery with reasonable fluency, expressiveness and comfort;

·       cope effectively with the tensions involved in public speaking;

·       demonstrate acceptable ethical standards in research and presentation of materials; and

·       listen to, analyze and critique oral communication.

 

Minor revisions/clarification 10/09/2015




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