GenEd Humanities Fine Arts Panel Meeting Summary for April 2013


ILLINOIS ARTICULATION INITIATIVE


To Facilitate Interinstitutional Transfer
Illinois Board of Higher Education
431, East Adams, Second Floor
Springfield, IL 62701-1418
tel: 217/557-7356
fax: 217/782-8548
Illinois Community College Board
401, East Capitol Avenue
Springfield, IL 62701-1711
tel: 217/524-5503
fax: 217/785-0090
samuel.wheeler@illinois.gov
 
Minutes for GenEd Humanities/Fine Arts Panel Meeting
ISU Alumni Center, Room 119 Friday, April 19, 2013
Members present: : Raymond Barnett(University of Illinois at Springfield), Anne Birberick(Northern Illinois University), David Deitemyer(Moraine Valley Community College), Sean Doyle(Moraine Valley Community College), Sarah Hein(Prairie State College), Allan Ho(Southern Illinois University Edwardsville), Krista Jackson(iTransfer System), Janice Leuchtenberg(iTransfer System), Shari Zeck(Illinois State University)
Members present virtually: Wayne Holly(Midstate College), Natasha Zaretsky(Southern Illinois University Carbondale)
Members Absent: Don Bevirt(Southwestern Illinois College), Emmett Bradbury(Chicago State University), Stephen Canfield(Eastern Illinois University), Kathleen Carot(Oakton Community College), Elizabeth Collins(Triton College), Dan Cullen(Illinois Board of Higher Education), Bill Feipel(Illinois Central College), T. Paulette Gilbert(Rock Valley College), Jonathan Gray(Southern Illinois University Carbondale), Thomas Hamel(Oakton Community College), Adam Julian(iTransfer System), Pamela Moriearty(Lincoln College), Amalia Pallares(University of Illinois at Chicago), David Palmer(John Wood Community College), Rashid Robinson(Illinois Board of Higher Education), Lily Siu(Richland Community College), Samuel Wheeler(Illinois Community College Board), Karen Zeilman(Illinois Valley Community College)

Minutes

Proposal for Creative Writing

 

Proposal

 

IAI should include Creative Writing classes on the GECC Humanities and Fine Arts list.

 

 

 

Definition

 

Creative Writing is the fine art of constructing narrative and of conveying concepts through the careful use of written language.

 

 

 

Rationale

 

Creative Writing is the fine art of constructing narrative:

  • Constructed narrative pervades all the arts—drama, film, opera, dance, painting, etc.—for, as the experts in these arts freely admit, each of these arts strives to tell a story about their subject matter, and this most often refers literally to a story.
  • Constructed narrative also pervades most other disciplines that express their information by telling a story: the commercials and ads produced in Marketing, the case as envisioned by the prosecution or the defense in Law, the account of what happened in History, etc.
  • A student who has had the benefit of a Creative Writing class is better able to not only construct and present such narrative but also to better understand and analyze such narrative when it is presented by others.  

 

Creative Writing is the fine art of conveying concepts through the careful use of written language:

  • The careful use of written language as a medium pervades all arts, for they all strive to find the most fitting and most meaningful words to label or explain their works.
  • The careful use of written language pervades all disciplines in higher education, so long as we as instructors continue to express ideas through the best possible choice of words, and so long as we as instructors expect students to express their own ideas through the best possible choice of words.
  • A student who has had the benefit of a Creative Writing class is better able to convey ideas through a series of carefully chosen words and is better able to understand ideas when presented as a series of carefully chosen words.

 

Is Creative Writing too narrow a focus for General Education?

  • Creative Writing is not at all a narrow focus in terms of General Education since (1) its specialty—narrative—pervades all other arts and most other disciplines, and since (2) its medium—language—pervades all of higher education.
  • Creative Writing is far more comprehensive a subject matter than almost all of the other subjects that are currently accepted as GECC Humanities and Fine Arts options. Specifically, Creative Writing is more comprehensive than:
    • F1900 : Music Appreciation
    • F1901 : Music History and Literature I
    • F1902 : Music History and Literature II
    • F1903N : Non-Western Music
    • F1904 : Introduction to American Music
    • F1905D : Ethnic Traditions in American Music(3 semester credits)
    • F1906 : Appreciation of Dance as an Art Form
    • F1907 : Theatre Appreciation
    • F1908 : History of Theatre
    • F1909D : Ethnic Traditions in American Theatre
    • F1910 : Opera Appreciation
    • F2902 : History of Western Art II
    • F2903N : Non-Western Art
    • F2904 : History of Photography
    • F2906D : Ethnic Traditions in American Art
    • F2907D : Art and Gender
    • F2908 : Film Appreciation
    • F2909 : Film History
    • F9900 : Introduction to the Visual and Performing Arts
    • HF906D : American Ethnic Cultural Expression
    • HF907D : Cultural Expression of Gender
    • HF908 : Film and Literature

 

Is a Fine Art like Creative Writing relevant to Illinois beyond the classroom?

  • According to the state of Illinois, the Creative Economy, which necessarily includes the specialty, the medium, and the subject of Creative Writing, is of vital importance. As reported by many news sources, such as The Murphysboro American, Governor Quinn said that to strengthen the creative economy in Illinois is to “create more economic growth and make Illinois an even more vibrant place to live and raise a family.” Such sources also report, “According to the Illinois Arts Alliance, the arts contribute at least $2.75 billion annually to our economy, creating more than $300 million in state and local tax revenue and supporting 78,000 full positions.”

 

Is there any harm in denying the legitimacy of Creative Writing as a General Education Fine Art option?

  • Yes, there is significant harm in denying the legitimacy of Creative Writing as a General Education Art option:
  • Such a denial tells the Creative Writing student, “Another student’s choice among the fundamental arts—such as music, painting, or film—is more valid than yours.” Such a message from IAI is painfully inequitable.
  • Such a denial also unwinds the logic of having approved the other arts and subjects currently on the GECC Humanities and Fine Arts list, meaning that such arts ought to be re-evaluated by the same standards that Creative Writing is being evaluated and ultimately denied as well.
  • Finally, such a denial keeps the list of approved courses completely absent from any writing art whatsoever. All writing arts excluded from the list of General Education Fine Arts… careful consideration of this fact reveals that it is a mistake and that it needs to be remedied. Including Creative Writing on the GECC Humanities and Fine Arts list is such a remedy.

 

 

 

 

Possible Course Descriptions

 

Introduction to Creative Writing

A study of the fine art of creative writing, emphasizing the construction of narrative and the careful use of written language in the creation of stories, poems, novels, scripts, etc., also emphasizing the fundamental elements of storytelling and poetry that appear in other forms and in all other cultures

 

Creative Writing: Fiction

A closer study of creative writing in the mode of fiction, with more emphasis on the construction of narrative and the careful use of written language as used in stories, novels, and scripts, also with emphasis on the fundamental elements of storytelling that appear in other forms and in all other cultures

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Created 3/22/2013

By Josh Woods

Kaskaskia College

jwoods@kaskaskia.edu

618-545-3241



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