GenEd Communication Panel Meeting Summary for November 2012


ILLINOIS ARTICULATION INITIATIVE


To Facilitate Interinstitutional Transfer
Illinois Board of Higher Education
431, East Adams, Second Floor
Springfield, IL 62701-1418
tel: 217/557-7356
fax: 217/782-8548
Illinois Community College Board
401, East Capitol Avenue
Springfield, IL 62701-1711
tel: 217/524-5502
fax: 217/785-0090
 
Minutes for GenEd Communication Panel Meeting
ISU Alumni Center, Kasten Conference Room, Normal, IL Friday, November 09, 2012
Members present: : Joanna Christopher(John A. Logan College), Lori Cinotte(Illinois Valley Community College), Kris Harding(Illinois State University), John Hill(Lincoln College), Ronald Howell(Illinois Central College), Krista Jackson(iTransfer System), Michelle Johnson(Black Hawk College), Jean-Marie Kauth(Benedictine University), Janice Leuchtenberg(iTransfer System), John Miller(Western Illinois University), Suzanne Sanders(Wilbur Wright College (CCC)), Cheri Simonds(Illinois State University), Julie Weishar(Parkland College), Jim Yeager(Highland Community College)
Members present virtually: Randy Greenwell(Spoon River College), Richard Jones(Eastern Illinois University)
Members Absent: Dan Cullen(Illinois Board of Higher Education), Thedford Jackson(Highland Community College), Adam Julian(iTransfer System), Lamata Mitchell(Rock Valley College), Bradley Peters(Northern Illinois University), Rashid Robinson(Illinois Board of Higher Education), Ed Schwarz(Prairie State College), Rick Soller(College of Lake County), Concetta Williams(Chicago State University)

Minutes

 

Guest Speakers:  Rachel Trimble (American Institute for Research), Beth Ratway (American Institute for Research), Debbie Meisner-Bertauski (IBHE), John Noak (ICCB).

 

  1.  Introductions and make sure technology is working.

 

  1. Course Review:

 

 

Courses for Five year review

1 courses

 

 

C2900: Oral Communication

 

Illinois State University

COM 110: Communication and Critical Inquiry

Final Decision : Accepted

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Courses

1 courses

 

C1901R: Writing Course Sequence

 

University of Illinois at Springfield

ENG 102: College Writing and Civic Engagement

Final Decision : Marked Conditionally Approved

 

Resubmitted Courses:

 

Resubmitted Courses for Five year review

0 courses

 

 

 

Resubmitted Original Courses

0 courses

 

  1. Review Conditionally Approved Courses submitted and try to make decisions on them

 

  1.  IAI Information
    1. Website information, training and orientation discussion, questions from members about IAI
    2. Review Course Review Procedures – approve documents on site http://www.itransfer.org/iai/container.aspx?section=faculty&subsection=panel&topic=panelRelatedDocs#G_COM
    3. GECC Com Online Course Statement – Approved as follows:
      1. “The GECC Communication online speech accommodation is a “new” accommodation within the C2 900 course description.  As such, all online sections should be submitted in order to determine that learning outcomes and course specifications are met.
    4. ISU’s Eng 145 Revised Learning Outcomes
      1. Panel will look at and have an email conversation

 

  1. Election of a Co-Chair to replace Lamata
    1. Jim Yeager and Lori Cinotte were nominated.  Due to her specialty being Writing and current co-chair John Miller is Speech, Lori was elected.

 

  1. Statewide Transfer Updates
    1. Core Curriculum Alignment:  Guests will lead this section
    2. Handouts attached to minutes
  1.  Other items from members

 

  1. 2013 meetings will be held Friday, March 15, 2013 and Friday, October 4, 2013 at either ISU Alumni Center or Heartland Comm. College. 

 

 

 

Highland College

SPCH 191-INT – Fundamentals of Speech (3 Credit Hours)

Spring 2013

 

Instructor:                  Jim Yeager

E-Mail:                       jim.yeager@highland.edu

Office:                                    M 209

Office Phone:             599-3432

Office Hours:             By appointment

 

Required Texts:

            Verderber & Verderber (2010). Communicate! 13th ed. Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth Publishing.

           

Course Description:

This course is designed to introduce the fundamentals of oral communication and the roles of the speaker, the listener, and the speech in the broad concept of public address. Emphasis is on the composition and presentation of various oral messages. IAI: C2 900

 

COURSE OUTCOMES AND COMPETENCIES

 

Course Outcome #1:                Communicate to others an understanding of the purpose and process of communication in public and group settings

 

COMPETENCIES – Student  will be able to:

 

  1. Identify a working definition of communication
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the key vocabulary in group and public communication.
  3. Identify the ethical responsibilities of a communicator
  4. Compare and contrast public speaking and conversation
  5. Differentiate among the general types/purposes of speeches
  6. Identify the advantages and disadvantages of different group decision making methods
  7. Demonstrate a willingness to apply effective interpersonal and inter-group behaviors
  8. Use basic problem solving techniques
  9. Identify techniques for creating cohesiveness in groups through climate building
  10. Analyze sources of power, influence and leadership in groups
  11. Demonstrate the ability to work appropriately in a small group

 

ASSESSMENT:                  Student will demonstrate development of these competencies through the following methods:

 

  1. Examinations
  2. Written evaluations of speeches in group and public settings

 

Course Outcome #2:                Develop appropriate methods for creating desirable speech content in informative and persuasive speeches

 

COMPETENCIES - A successful student will be able to:

 

  1. Conduct an audience analysis
  2. Choose appropriate speech topics
  3. Differentiate between a general and specific purpose
  4. Develop appropriate specific purposes and thesis statements
  5. Identify different types of supporting material
  6. Demonstrate an ability to gather appropriate supporting material
  7. Analyze and evaluate evidence in order to make inferences and generate conclusions
  8. Choose appropriate visual aids
  9. Demonstrate an ability to comfortably use a variety of audio-visual aids
  10. Identify the types of propositions used in persuasive speeches
  11. Explain the role of logic and emotion in the persuasive process
  12. Use various appeals successfully in the presentation of a persuasive message
  13. Identify major factors which affect speaker credibility
  14. Critique their own oral presentations and make revisions and improve them

 

ASSESSMENT: Students will demonstrate development of these competencies through the following methods:

 

  1. Preparation and presentation of at least three substantial speeches, include both informative and persuasive speeches.

 

Course Outcome #3:                Develop and use effective organizational techniques

 

COMPETENCIES  - A successful student will be able to:

 

  1. Identify the functions of introductions and conclusions
  2. Use effective methods for opening and closing speeches
  3. Use transitions, signposts and other connectives
  4. Use appropriate techniques for organizing ideas for specific speech situations
  5. Develop and write appropriately detailed preparation outlines

 

ASSESSMENT:                  Students will demonstrate development of these competencies through the following methods:

 

  1. Preparation and presentation of at least three substantial speeches, include both informative and persuasive speeches.

 

Course Outcome #4:                Develop the poise and confidence necessary to utilize appropriate presentational skills and utilize those skills

 

COMPETENCIES  - A successful student will be able to:

 

  1. Identify the sources of communication apprehension
  2. Recognize symptoms of performance anxiety
  3. Create and use strategies for dealing with communication apprehension
  4. Compare and contrast several delivery styles and choose the appropriate style for a particular speaking situation
  5. Identify and use appropriate techniques for rehearsing a speech
  6. Prepare and use effective speaking notes, when appropriate

 

ASSESSMENT:                  Students will demonstrate development of these competencies through the following methods:

 

  1. Preparation and presentation of at least three substantial speeches, include both informative and persuasive speeches.
  2. Active and appropriate participation in group projects.

 

Course Outcome #5:                Listen carefully to the messages of others and provide objective feedback to other communicators.

 

COMPETENCIES  - A successful student will be able to:

 

  1. Differentiate between listening and hearing
  2. Identify common misconceptions about listening
  3. Identify common listening failures
  4. Differentiate between relational and presentational (critical) listening
  5. Demonstrate the ability to use active listening techniques
  6. Provide direct feedback to communicators about public presentations, using appropriate evaluation factors
  7. Identify main ideas, facts, and opinions from oral presentations
  8. Observe and critically evaluate the communication behaviors of other people working in groups
  9. Demonstrate competency in these skills by actively participating in class discussions and activities.

 

ASSESSMENT:                  Students will demonstrate development of these competencies through the following methods:

 

  1. Written and oral speech evaluations
  2. Examinations

 

Instructor’s Philosophy:

Public speaking is considered by some to be more frightening than death. That’s a pretty tall order. It is my belief that public speaking should not be seen as something to fear, but as something to use to help you achieve greater success in whatever your chosen field may be. I will do my best to help you overcome any potential fears and develop a strong and natural speaking ability. However, as you will learn from this class, communication is a two-way street, so to help you, you must help me. The following are some insights that might help in this process:

  • Speech is a process; nothing happens overnight. If you truly wish to become a better speaker, you must be patient with me, but more importantly, with yourself.

 

  • This is not a “blow-off” class. You will be challenged, mentally, in ways you may not have thought of before. Be prepared and be open.

 

  • The skills you learn in this class will be skills you utilize immediately.

 

  • The fact that you are in this class has earned you my respect. I would sincerely hope that I can expect similar treatment from you.

 

  • This (virtual) classroom is a place of free expression, respect, and critical thinking. I openly invite and encourage all of you to share your views on any and all subjects we discuss in the class. However, I ask that you do so respectfully and in full understanding that when challenged, it is for the sake of the greater learning process. On occasion, words, terms, or ideas that some might consider profane will be brought up. If you are offended by certain language or topics, contact me in private and I will do my best to satisfy your request. Please understand: failure to communicate effectively with me means that I cannot effectively help you.

 

 

 

 

Grading Breakdown:                                                                                  Grading Scale

Informative Speech                 (5-6 Minutes)   =          125 points              900-1000 pts. = A

Persuasive Speech                   (5-6 Minutes)   =          175 points              800-899   pts. = B

Speaker’s Choice                     (5-6 Minutes)    =         250 points              700-799   pts. = C

Quizzes                                                                        =          100 points              600-699   pts. = D

Critical Analysis Paper                                     =          50 points                <599        pts. = F

Principles Exam                                               =          100 points

Application Exam                                            =          150 points

Participation/Peer Reviews                               =          50 points

TOTAL                                                           =          1000 points

 

*Any student who does not complete all three speeches will receive an immediate “F.”

 

General Guidelines:

 

  1. Plagiarism, or any other type of cheating, in any form, will not be tolerated. Anyone caught plagiarizing/cheating will receive an immediate “0” on the assignment and will be reported to the appropriate office.

 

  1. All speeches must be recorded and submitted in accordance with the following guidelines:
  1. The speech must be recorded in one continuous, static shot.
  2. The speaker is responsible for populating his/her audience with at least eight (8) audience members who are of, at least, 16 years of age.
  3. The speaker and audience members must be visible on the recording for the duration of the speech.
  4. The speaker is responsible for finding a venue appropriate for her/his speech. Appropriate venues include, but are not limited to, a work place, house of worship, classroom, civic meeting place, etc.
  5. The speaker must submit his/her recorded speech to the instructor via e-mail or hard copy by the due date specified for that particular speech. If the student chooses to submit his/her speech via e-mail, it is the student’s responsibility to see to it that the file is formatted in a way that the instructor can successfully hear and see the speech. If the student chooses to submit his/her speech by hard copy, it is the student’s responsibility to see to it that the hard copy is received by the instructor by the date it is due.
  6. In addition to the recorded speech, the student must submit the instructor approved “Audience Participation Waiver” (found on moodle) with the signature of at least eight (8) of the audience members for the given speech.
  7. It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that the speech was recorded with both proper audio and video.
  8. Once a student has submitted his/her speech, that video (including the media it was delivered on, in the case of a hard copy submission) becomes the property of Highland Community College. Highland Community College and the instructor for this course agree to not publicly publish any speech received through the delivery of this course; however, Highland Community College and the instructor for this course do reserve the right to use any speeches received through the delivery of this course for internal assessment, peer review, and training purposes. By submitting his/her first speech, the student acknowledges and agrees to the conditions put forth in this document.

 

DATE                          TOPIC & ASSIGNMENTS                  READING ASSIGNMENTS

************************************************************************

WEEK 1

1/14-1/18                     Communication Perspectives                           Chap. 1

                                    Perception of Self and Others                          Chap. 2                                   

************************************************************************

WEEK 2

1/21-1/25                     Communicating Verbally                                 Chap. 3

                                    Communicating Through Nonverbal Behavior            Chap. 4

************************************************************************

WEEK 3

1/28-2/1                       Communicating Across Cultures                      Chap. 6

Communicating in Relationships                     Chap. 7

Developing Intimacy in Relationships             Chap. 8

************************************************************************

WEEK 4

2/4-2/8                         Listening and Responding                                Chap. 5

                                    Interviewing                                                     Appendix

Participating in Group Communication                        Chap. 9

Member Roles and Leadership in Groups        Chap. 10

************************************************************************

WEEK 5         

2/11-2/15                     Informative Speaking                                      Chap. 15

                                    Developing Your Topic and Doing Research   Chap. 11

                                    Organizing Your Speech                                  Chap. 12

************************************************************************

WEEK 6         

2/18-2/22                     Adapting Verbally & Visually                         Chap. 13

Overcoming Speech Apprehension                  Chap. 14

************************************************************************

WEEK 7

2/25-3/1                       Persuasive Speaking                                        Chap. 16

Fallacies in Reasoning                                     No Reading

                                    Foundations of Rhetoric                                              No Reading

************************************************************************

WEEK 8

3/4-3/8                         NO CHAPTERS ASSIGNED

************************************************************************

 

DUE DATES

 

Monday, February 11              Principles Exam

Friday, March 1                                   Critical Analysis Paper

Wednesday, March 6               All Speeches

Friday, March 8                                   Application Exam

 

 

 

 

 

 

MAJOR ASSIGNMENTS

 

Informative Speech Assignment (125 points)

Requirements:

  • Each speech will be 5-6 minutes in length.
  • Each speech must have an introduction, thesis statement, preview statement, at least three (3) main points, and a conclusion.
  • You are required to cite at least three (3) different credible sources.
  • Each student must hand in a typed outline of his/her speech on the day he/she is assigned to speak. Failure to turn in a typed outline will result in an automatic “0.”
  • Speeches are to be delivered extemporaneously (not memorized, but not on-the-fly.) Students are permitted to utilize one (1) 3x5 note card, front and back.
  • Students are also required to provide adequate feedback for each of her/his classmates’ speeches. Failure to provide adequate feedback will result in an automatic letter grade penalty.

 

Persuasive Speech Assignment (175 points)

Requirements:

  • Each speech will be 5-6 minutes in length.
  • Each speech must have an introduction, thesis statement, preview statement, at least three (3) main points, and a conclusion.
  • You are required to cite at least three (3) different credible sources, from varying styles of resources (i.e. one internet source, one magazine, one newspaper, etc.).
  • Students will be gauged on their ability to follow a clear structure, as well as their ability to make sound and logical arguments.
  • Each student must hand in a typed outline of his/her speech on the day he/she is assigned to speak. Failure to turn in a typed outline will result in an automatic “0.”
  • Speeches are to be delivered extemporaneously (not memorized, but not on-the-fly). Students are permitted to utilize one (1) note card, one (1) side only.
  • Each student must clear his/her speech topic with the instructor prior to his/her speaking day. Failure to receive approval of your topic will result in an automatic “0.”
  • Students are also required to provide adequate feedback for each of her/his classmates’ speeches. Failure to provide adequate feedback will result in an automatic letter grade penalty.

 

Speaker’s Choice Assignment (250 points)

Students are allowed to choose whether they would like to do an informative or persuasive speech. Students who choose to give an informative speech are held to the same standards expressed in the Informative Speech assignment. Students who choose to give a persuasive speech are held to the same standards expressed in the Persuasive Speech assignment.


 

 

(Student’s Name),

 

You are receiving this letter because you have registered for a section of Fundamentals of Speech Online (SPCH 191-INT). This letter is intended to give you a clear picture of what is expected of students participating in this section of the class. As with all of my students, I fully and honestly want you to succeed in this course. To better prepare you, I have found it helpful to be upfront and direct about the specific challenges facing a student in this type of learning environment.

 

To begin, this approach to the course is not for everyone. Self-starters and self-motivators tend to excel in this type of environment, but students who are not able to effectively and efficiently schedule their time tend to underperform. In an online learning environment, you must be diligent and self-reliant.

 

Especially with this type of class, you also must be very comfortable with technology. In addition to knowing and feeling comfortable with Moodle (our online course delivery system), you also must have access to and know how to operate a video recording device. While I can provide some basic level technical support, the incredibly broad range of recording devices available to the public make it nearly impossible for me to know how to troubleshoot your particular device. As a result, you must either know how to operate the equipment yourself, or take it upon yourself to find adequate help in that area.

 

Finally, as a potential online student, it is of absolute importance that you use and frequently check your Highland e-mail account. If you prefer to use another e-mail account (Gmail, Yahoo, etc.), that is fine; but be sure to set up your Highland e-mail account to forward any messages to your preferred account. For directions on how to do this, please contact me via e-mail. Your Highland e-mail account is how I will contact you from this point forward. This is the last non-digital communication you will receive from me. If that in and of itself makes you uncomfortable with moving forward in this class, then this format might not be a good fit for you.

 

In closing, please take a moment to take the self-assessment quiz found accompanying this letter. After answering the questions honestly, ask yourself if the format of this class is a good fit for you. In addition, to the quiz, you will also find the preliminary syllabus for this class to give you an idea of what kind of workload is expected from students in this class.

 

Now that you have a better idea of what is expected of you in this course, and if you are confident in your ability to work within its parameters, then you can look for an e-mail from me the week before the semester begins explaining your first assignment. I look forward to hearing from you and helping you become a more confident, polished, and clear public speaker.

 

 

 

Jim Yeager, Instructor

Highland Community College

jim.yeager@highland.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Online Learning Self-Assessment

 

  1. Feeling that I am part of a physical classroom setting is:
  1. Unnecessary.
  2. Somewhat important.
  3. Very important.
  1. I generally:
  1. Get things done ahead of time.
  2. Need reminders, but get things done on time.
  3. Put things off until the last minute.
  1. I prefer to communicate:
  1. In writing.
  2. In person, but I’m comfortable expressing myself in writing.
  3. In person, face-to-face. I do not like to write.
  1. I would classify myself as:
  1. A good reader, able to understand most text material without help.
  2. An average reader. Sometimes I need help understanding the material.
  3. A slow reader. I often need help understanding text material.
  1. I think face-to-face classroom discussion:
  1. Is helpful, but discussion via e-mail is equally engaging.
  2. Is sometimes helpful.
  3. Is vital.
  1. I generally prefer to:
  1. Figure out instructions myself.
  2. Try to follow instructions on my own, then ask for help as needed.
  3. Have instructions explained or demonstrated to me.
  1. When faced with new technology such as gadgets and computer software I usually:
  1. Look forward to learning new skills.
  2. Feel some apprehension, but try it anyway.
  3. Avoid working with new technology.
  1. Taking into account my professional and personal schedule, I have:
  1. Maybe even more time for an online course than an on-campus course since I don’t have to commute.
  2. About same amount of time for an online course or an on-campus course.
  3. Less time for an online course than on on-campus course.
  1. If I have to go to campus to take exams or complete work I:
  1. Can make arrangements to do so almost anytime.
  2. Will need to make an evening or weekend appointment.
  3. Would have difficulty going to campus at any time.

 

Scoring:

Three points for each “a” answer

Two points for each “b” answer

One point for each “c” answer

 

21+ points: An online course would probably be a good fit for you.

15-20 points: An online course could work for you, but you should be prepared to make a few adjustments in your schedule and study habits to succeed. A hybrid course may be a good first step.

14-9 points: An online course is probably not the best way for you to learn right now. Your chance for success would be better if you enrolled in a traditional on-campus course.

 

 

Files associated with this meeting

File NameDescription 
CCSSGAPANALYSISGECC-CommOCCSS Gap AnalysisDownload File
GapAnalysisMatrix--ELAIntCCSS Gap AnalysisDownload File


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