GenEd Communication Panel Meeting Summary for November 2011


ILLINOIS ARTICULATION INITIATIVE


To Facilitate Interinstitutional Transfer
Illinois Board of Higher Education
431, East Adams, Second Floor
Springfield, IL 62701-1418
tel: 217/557-7356
fax: 217/782-8548
blankenberger@ibhe.org
Illinois Community College Board
401, East Capitol Avenue
Springfield, IL 62701-1711
tel: 217/524-5502
fax: 217/785-0090
Malinda.Aiello@illinois.gov
 
Minutes for GenEd Communication Panel Meeting
ISU's Alumni Center Room 119 Friday, November 04, 2011
Members present: : Abhilasha Gupta(iTransfer System), John Hill(Lincoln College), Ronald Howell(Illinois Central College), Krista Jackson(iTransfer System), Krista Jackson(iTransfer System), Thedford Jackson(Highland Community College), Michelle Johnson(Black Hawk College), Jean-Marie Kauth(Benedictine University), David Knopp(Illinois Board of Higher Education), Janice Leuchtenberg(iTransfer System), John Miller(Western Illinois University), Bradley Peters(Northern Illinois University), Bradley Peters(Northern Illinois University), Suzanne Sanders-Betzold(Wilbur Wright College (CCC)), Ed Schwarz(Prairie State College), Julie Weishar(Parkland College), Jim Yeager(Highland Community College)
Members present virtually: Randy Greenwell(Spoon River College), Richard Jones(Eastern Illinois University)
Members Absent: Malinda Aiello(Illinois Community College Board), Bob Blankenberger(Illinois Board of Higher Education), Lori Cinotte(Illinois Valley Community College), Cara Anne Finnegan(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Lamata Mitchell(Rock Valley College), Rick Soller(College of Lake County), Dheeraj Vatti(iTransfer System), Concetta Williams(Chicago State University)

Minutes

  1.  Introductions and make sure technology is working.

 

  1. Course Review:

 

Courses for Five year review

24 courses

 

 

C1900: Writing Course Sequence

 

Danville Area Community College

ENGL 101: Rhetoric and Composition I

Final Decision : Accepted

 

 

Morton College

ENG 101: Rhetoric I

Final Decision : Marked Incomplete

 

Rock Valley College

ENG 101: Composition I

Final Decision : Accepted

 

 

Shawnee Community College

ENG 111: English Composition

Final Decision : Accepted

 

 

Western Illinois University

ENG 180: College Writing I

Final Decision : Accepted

 

 

C1900R: Writing Course Sequence

 

Eastern Illinois University

ENG 1001G: Composition and Language

Final Decision : Marked Incomplete

 

 

Eastern Illinois University

ENG 1091G: Composition and Language, Honors

Final Decision : Marked Incomplete

 

 

Heartland Community College

ENGL 101: Composition I

Final Decision : Marked Incomplete

 

 

C1901R: Writing Course Sequence

 

Danville Area Community College

ENGL 102: Rhetoric and Composition II

Final Decision : Accepted

 

 

DePaul University

WRD 104: Composition & Rhetoric II

Final Decision : Marked Incomplete

 

 

 

 

Eastern Illinois University

ENG 1092G: Composition and Literature, Honors

Final Decision : Marked Incomplete

 

 

Heartland Community College

ENGL 102: Composition II

Final Decision : Marked Incomplete

 

 

Morton College

ENG 102: Rhetoric II

Final Decision : Accepted

 

 

Rock Valley College

ENG 103: Composition II

Final Decision : Accepted

 

 

Shawnee Community College

ENG 112: English Composition

Final Decision : Marked Incomplete

 

 

Western Illinois University

ENG 280: College Writing II

Final Decision : Marked Incomplete

 

 

C2900: Oral Communication

 

Danville Area Community College

SPCH 101: Oral Communication

Final Decision : Accepted

 

 

Danville Area Community College

SPCH 102: Public Speaking

Final Decision : Accepted

 

 

Heartland Community College

COMM 101: Introduction to Oral Communications

Final Decision : Marked Incomplete

 

 

Illinois Central College

COMM 110: Communication: Process & Practice

Final Decision : Marked Incomplete

 

 

Lewis University

10-112: Intro to Human Communication

Final Decision : Accepted

 

 

Moraine Valley Community College

COM 103: Speech Fundamentals

Final Decision : Accepted

 

 

Rock Valley College

SPH 131: Fundamentals of Communication

Final Decision : Returned

 

 

Shawnee Community College

SPC 111: Speech

Final Decision : Marked Incomplete

 

 

 

New Courses

0 courses

 

Resubmitted Courses:

 

Resubmitted Courses for Five year review

5 courses

 

 

C1901R: Writing Course Sequence

 

Harper College

ENG 102: Composition

Final Decision : Returned

 

 

Illinois Central College

ENGL 111: Composition II

Final Decision : Accepted

 

 

 

 

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

ENG 102: English Composition II

Final Decision : Accepted

 

 

C2900: Oral Communication

 

Frontier Community College (IECC)

SPE 1101: Fundamentals of Effective Speaking

Final Decision : Returned

 

 

Southwestern Illinois College

SPCH 151: Fundamentals of Public Speaking

Final Decision : Accepted

 

 

 

Resubmitted Original Courses

5 courses

 

C1900: Writing Course Sequence

 

McKendree University

ENG-111: English I

Final Decision : Marked Incomplete

 

 

University of Illinois at Springfield

CAP 115: Interdisciplinary Writing

Final Decision : Accepted

 

C2900: Oral Communication

 

Sauk Valley Community College

SPE 131: Introduction to Oral Communication

Final Decision : Marked Incomplete

 

  1. IAI Major directive responses: 

 

  1. Review of Round 1 responses
  2. Krista will send comments via email from “no” responses, and work over summer to get those to “yes” responses.
  3. Some courses at upper level at institutions we won’t be able to fix to transfer credits as course is major not elective from “no” response schools

 

 

  1. Legislation update – SB 00059

 

  1. Web site complaint area is a good way to collect problem information about transfers.
  2. Can the panel get a summary of related questions/complaints?  Contact Krista
  3. Legislations could change how transfer works within Illinois.
  4. Senator Silverstein used legislation from California that had no program like IAI.  He basically replaced California with Illinois in the bill.
  5. SB 00059 basically says that if a student has his/her Associates degree, they are given some measure of security when transferring to a 4 year school, at the Jr. level.
  6. Unintended consequences:
    1. Major may not be open
    2. Better to transfer before Associate level reached

 

  1.  Other Items:

 

  1. IAI Policies and Procedures Manual being updated, hopefully completed in November.
  2. Krista reviewed the new facelift to the website being prepared, hopefully for deployment in the new year.
  3. Discussion re Proposed Requirements for an Online Public Speaking Class.
    1. Purpose – to maintain the public nature of online speaking for online courses
    2. Text provided by John Miller:

 

Proposed Requirements for an Online Public Speaking Class

 

Besides meeting all other IAI requirements, a totally online public speaking course must meet the following:

  1. There must be a minimum of 6 audience members present for each speech with all audience members visible on the recording.
  2. Speeches must be presented in an appropriate setting for a public speech (ie, sitting around a living room in couches, camp fire, etc is not accepted; ideally students will have their speeches recorded where the audience is sitting in front to them in some semblance of rows of chairs or similar )
  3. Students are encouraged to utilize “real world speaking situations” to meet assignment requirements.  As such, students are strongly encouraged to utilize work, community, and similar situations to record their speeches.  Classroom speeches in other classes are not permitted.
  4. Students are expected to utilize appropriate technology despite the challenges of access (most public libraries have LCD projectors available for in library use).
  5. The quality of the recording must permit clear sound and visual pictures.
  6. Students are not permitted to edit a speech.
  7. If posting a speech, student’s privacy must be protected.
  8. Students are required to complete either a self-reflection/critique of own speeches or those of their classmates.
  9. Colleges and universities offering an online course format are limited to no more than 10% of all sections in this format for the public speaking class.  Ninety percent or more of all course sections must be offered in the traditional face-to-face class setting with presentations presented before the instructor and the other students in the class. 

 

  1. Illinois Speech & Theatre Association has crafted a position paper.  Conclusion – students need to learn to communicate face-to-face.  Text provided by Ed Schwarz

 

ILLINOIS SPEECH AND THEATRE ASSOCIATION:

ORGANIZATIONAL POSITION ON IAI STANDARDS FOR THE ONLINE BASIC SPEECH COURSE

 

The Illinois Speech and Theatre Association (ISTA) is a state-wide organization comprised of higher education and secondary education teachers whose expertise falls under the larger umbrella of communication, with various emphases on speech instruction, forensics coaching, theatre direction, among others. As an organization whose membership is primarily focused on teaching the foundations of communication from various perspectives and through various methods, we firmly believe in the necessity of live interaction, comprised of at least some aspect of face to face engagement. With that in mind, we understand the future of education is moving towards and will continue to focus on online instruction. Many in our profession, if not most, understand the need and desire for students, faculty, and administrators to have access to online instruction.  Our biggest concern at this point in time is the ability to fairly, accurately, and effectively evaluate presentations given in a form other than face to face in a classroom with a live audience (ie, online, via Skype, digital recordings, etc.) With this is mind, we believe it is imperative to address the concerns and maintain the standards that follow below:

 

"Concerns about the Online Basic Course" 

 

  • The traditional communication model is at the heart of all communication interaction,

whether it is teaching public speaking, interpersonal communication, group communication, argument, or theatre.  If we use the traditional communication model, there are a few elements that may not be pedagogically sound when it comes to online student presentations:

  • Source – Observing the sender effectively through an online 2-dimensional projection. For instance, there is no way to determine if a recorded presentation is the student’s first time giving the presentation formally.  How do we know if this is the best version of numerous previous attempts?  Additionally, the required extemporaneous delivery style set forth by IAI would not allow for the speaker, or the evaluator, to adapt to the audience off the cuff in the same way if behind a video camera.
  • Channel – The channel that we witness is mediated; effectively and fully evaluate things like eye contact, physical proximity, immediacy.   There is too much physical and psychological distance for this to be an authentic test of their speaking ability.
  • Receiver – Determining if speakers are using audience adaptation or responding to audience feedback.  How do we determine who the audience is?  How do we measure communication apprehension if the audience is composed of friends and family? Furthermore, many courses require the evaluation of each student’s ability to listen effectively.  Without the face to face speeches, this crucial element for effective communication evaluation is no longer an option.
  • Context – Ensuring that all students have a common experience, so that we can safely say ‘they have this set of skills now.’

 

  • Online classes – Student success and retention in online classes.  Are online classes becoming less popular now with lower retention rates?  Are online classes a trend that are losing steam as students realize they may not be as ideal as they thought?  We cite the July, 2011 Chronicle of Higher Education as a significant source that illustrates that online classes are resulting in significant rates of course incompletion and/or course failure.

 

  • Teaching online classes – Many faculty (full-time and adjunct) are not properly trained on how to teach online classes.  If we are going to offer a class such as Introduction to Communication (the performance aspects of the course would make the course fundamentally different than many other online courses) online, we have to ensure that we are doing it right and doing it well.

 

  • Integrity of the class and process – Ensuring that all students get a similar experience in all formats (online, hybrid, face-to-face). Issues relating to practicing the speech until they get it perfect and using that take rather than getting in front of their audience and not being allowed to start over – this is not the same experience for all students and may offer those online an unfair advantage.  Another big concern is communication apprehension and the suspicion of students ‘cherry-picking’ their audiences.  Does this provide them with an authentic public speaking situation that will prepare them for the real world?  If an audience or event is picked by the student, does that audience or speaking situation call for the IAI mandated extemporaneous delivery style? Not all speaking situations outside the classroom are the same, as some call for manuscript delivery, thus negating the extemporaneous delivery style requirement.

 

With these concerns in mind, we as an organization understand the need to accommodate students who cannot physically appear on campus for legitimate and documented reasons. Subsequently, the following items are provided to address the above concerns in relation to such student needs:

 

1. There is room for crafting an accommodation policy as an addendum to the current face-to-face requirement.  This would mean that IAI maintains the face-to-face requirement as the standard, but would allow an accommodation for students who could not come to campus. 


2.  The language of the policy could recommend that accommodations might be made for students in on the ground sections, or in the hybrid delivery mode (mostly online, but with speeches face-to-face) by allowing students needing that option to find their own audiences and tape their speeches (as long as minimum requirements are met).  If needed, an institution could also create an online section to accommodate the need.


3. Minimum requirements for taped speeches would be crafted into the policy.

 

  1. Sample Syllabus for an existing non-IAI course provided by John Miller:

 

Comm. 241

Introduction to Public Speaking

Fall 2007

 

Instructor: John Miller                                                Section: Online Section 1

Office: 216 Sallee Hall                                                Office Phone: 309-298-1197

E-mail: J-Miller@wiu.edu

 

Required Textbook

Grice, G. L. & Skinner, J. F. (2007). Mastering Public Speaking, 6th edition. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

 

Course objectives:

Student who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the communication process.
  2. Recognize effective and ineffective communication messages in public settings.
  3. Construct effective presentations that strategically respond to the dynamics of the rhetorical situation.
  4. Deliver presentations in a clear and engaging manner.
  5. Critically assess oral messages in a public setting.

 

General Course Procedures

1. Failure to complete any speaking assignment will result in a failing grade for the course.

2. This is a 16 week course.  The semester ends on Dec. 13.  There will be no extensions of this deadline accept for well documented reasons.  Do not put this course off to the last minute.

3. You videotaped speeches must be postmarked on or before the due date.  Failure to do so will result in lowering your grade by two letter grades for each day late.  The only exception to this policy is a documented and approved reason such as an illness.  Please note that late speeches must be approved.  It is your responsibility to contact the instructor.  If there is a problem beyond your control, don’t hesitate to contact me; we can usually work something out.

4. In some instances, mail can be lost or delayed.  This is neither your nor my fault.  I encourage students to keep a copy of their speeches before they send them in just in case the speech is lost in the mail.  Additionally, there have been circumstances where the mail was delayed, and I did not receive a speech until after the semester ended.  If a student is progressing in the class, I typically record an incomplete in these circumstances. 

5. Pleased be advised that weapons of any type are not permitted on tapes regardless of your purpose.  In other words, do not use a gun, pellet gun, bow and arrow, large knives, throwing stars, or anything else (or resembles such a device) that can injure an audience member even if the purpose is purely demonstration.  If you are unsure if your visual aid violates this policy, talk to your instructor.

6. Speech topics must be appropriate for a classroom/public setting.  Speeches that encourage audience members to participate in illegal and/or unethical actions are not acceptable.  Your speech will not be viewed and will be considered not prepared for the presentation (see number 3).  If in doubt, please discuss your topic with your instructor prior to the day of delivery.

7. Students are expected to purchase the course textbook.  A significant amount of the learning will occur through individual readings of the text.  If, as a student, you tend not to read required textbooks, this is not the class for you.

8. Students should be proficient with the Internet, web pages, and online-learning.  The instructor is an expert in public speaking and not technology.  I cannot solve your individual computer or network problems.

9. Students must have reliable access to the Internet.

10. The course is not a completely study at your own pace course.  Though students have more control of their time than a traditional classroom, public speaking requires a steady progression towards the desired competencies.  There are due dates for all speaking assignments and late penalties will be assigned when these dates are not met. Only under extremely rare situations will extensions be graded.

11. Videotapes will not be returned to the student unless the student provides a stamped (with sufficient postage), self-addressed.  Even in this case, there is no guarantee that the tape will be returned in time for the next assigned speech.

12. The instructor is not online 24 hours a day.  If you send an email to the instructor, it may take a day or two before you receive a response. The instructor checks email Monday- Thursday at 10:00 am.  I rarely check email over the weekends

 

 

Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)

In accordance with University policy and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), academic accommodations may be made for any student who notifies the instructor of the need for accommodation.  It is imperative that you take the initiative to bring such needs to the instructor’s attention, as he/she is not legally permitted to inquire about such particular needs of students.  Students who may require special assistance in emergency evacuations (i.e. fire, tornado, etc.) should contact the instructor as to the most appropriate procedures to follow in such an emergency.  Contact Disability Support Services at 298-2512 for additional services.

 

Plagiarism

Cases of plagiarism will be treated in a severe manner as they thwart the learning process.  The University defines plagiarism as “the submission of the work of someone else as one’s own” (25).  Grice and Skinner (2007) add, “plagiarism is the unattributed use of another’s ideas, words, or pattern of organization” (30).  It includes, but is not limited to:

  1. giving someone else’s speech.
  2. reading your speech from published material without citing the source in your presentation.  Please note, material found on the Internet is considered published.
  3. paraphrasing or quoting someone without attributing the quote in your speech.
  4. working with someone (other than your instructor or his/her designee) to construct your speech and presenting it as your own.
  5. Turning in someone else’s outline.
  6. Using the words of published materials on your outline without attributing the source.
  7. Using another’s pattern of organization

All students are required to turn in two copies of their speech outlines.  These outlines are kept on file for future comparison.  (Yes, we have a file cabinet filled with speech outlines from students).  Students who plagiarize may have their grade reduced, receive a zero for the assignment, receive a failing grade for the course, and/or face University disciplinary action.  If you have any doubt, please talk to your instructor prior to giving the speech.  The Universities Academic Integrity Policy may be found at: http://www.wiu.edu/policies/acintegrity.php

 

Incomplete

An incomplete may be given to students in cases where they have been unable to complete course work due to circumstances beyond their control.  Only special circumstances are considered when granting an incomplete, and the student must have “C” average or higher in the course and have completed a significant portion of the class.

 

Tests

All Students will complete Three Unit Tests.  These tests are embedded in the various modules and consist of 25 multiple choice questions.  You will have only 25 minutes to complete each test.

 

Speeches:

The majority of your grade will be determined by your speaking assignments.  Two outlines are required for each major speech and are to be turned in to the instructor when you mail the tape/dvd.  Students should utilize the Videotape/DVD Checklist to ensure the speech is properly recorded.  You must have an audience of at least six people.  There is not exception to this rule and your grade will be reduced by one letter grade for each missing audience member.  Importantly, please double check dvd’s before you send them.  Some recorders require that dvd’s be “finalized” before they can play on other machines.  If I cannot play the dvd, I can’t grade the speech.  The tape format may be any of the following: VHS, DVD, Mini DV, 8MM (Not High 8), or VHSC.  

  • Speech 1: Demonstration/Process Speech focuses on audience analysis, topic selection, purpose, and thesis statement (5-6 minutes).
  • Speech 2: Informative Speech will focus on outlining, organization, support, transitions, introduction, conclusion, and vocal variety. (7-8 minutes)Speech 2 is delivered twice.  Please read the directions carefully for this assignment.
  • Speech 3: Persuasive Speech will focus on persuasion and language (9-10minutes).

 

Speeches must be postmarked on or before the due date.  For every day late, the speech grade will be lowered by two letter grades.  The due dates are:

            Speech One is due by Sept. 26

            Speech Two is due by Oct. 31

            Speech Three is due by Dec. 5

Students are encouraged to use “real speaking situations” for their graded assignments.  This includes, but is not limited to, work situations, community events, public organizations, etc. Assignments will be adjusted to account for the unique situations you may find yourself in or are available to you; however all situations must permit for a formal presentation that closely resembles the assignments expectations.  Please contact the instructor for more information.

 

Speeches should be sent to:

 

John Miller

Department of Communication

WIU

221 Sallee Hall

Macomb Il 61455

 


 

Video/DVD Checklist

 

_____ Format of the tape is VHS, DVD, 8 (Not High 8), VHSC, CD, MiniDV

_____ Did you play back the tape to ensure clear quality?

_____ Six audience members are clearly visible on the tape

_____ When played back, the speaker's volume is sufficiently loud

_____ Speaker is clearly visible

_____ All visual aids are clearly visible

_____ Speech presented in a formal setting (ie not outside with audience sitting around a fire

_____ Tape cued up to the beginning of the speech

_____ Speech outline and any other requirements included

Send tapes to:

John Miller

Department of Communication

WIU

Sallee Hall

Macomb Il 61455

  1. Formal Charge:  Sub-Committee to return recommendation at Spring Meeting – So Moved by Ed Schwarz, Seconded by Julie Weishar

 

  1. To create language for an online C2900 course. Accomodation to IAI Guidelines.
  2. Timeline – Report February 15 for Spring Discussion
  3. Members:  Jim Yeager, Julie Weishar, Ron Howell, Michelle Johnson, John Miller, Ed Schwarz
  4. Prerequisites in general – TJ had already left.
  5. John Hill wanted to make all aware that there may be a timeframe issue along with other issues for Adult Learners at some institutions. 
    1. Decisions are being made on a case-by-case basis
    2. Two private 4 years may not accept courses, but they may not be IAI courses.

 

 

  1. Next Meeting:  Friday, March 9, 2012 at 10:00 am.  The fall meeting will be November 9, 2012.

 

 



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